4 VITAL Things To Know As An Indie Author (The Emotional Rollercoaster, part 2)

Well, maybe that last one...
You ROCK!

 

If you wrote a book and published it, congratulations! You’re a small business owner, and entrepreneur. A budding capitalist.

 

You write your product. That’s cool!

 

Then, you sell your product.

 

So… you’re a salesperson.

 

Ugh.

scared%20mom
Salesperson??? Nooooo!

Most of you NEVER wanted to be salespeople.

 

Your book/books are your business, and you have a small staff of employees. Probably just you. That means you are the boss, but also the manufacturer, the salesperson, the marketer, the accountant… the janitor… Since without sales there really isn’t any business, the most important thing is selling the product (after you have a product).

 

Whether it is a hobby or a part-time job or full-time job, that just means the amount of JOY or PAIN & SUFFERING you go through are magnified. Whether you are selling 1 book a week, 1 book an hour, or 1 book a minute, you probably want that number to go up.

 

Pick a good number of sales for a day, a week, or a month, or a year, and manage your expectations to trends, not little blips. Doesn’t matter what number you pick; some of you are new and some of you have been doing this a while. When I published my first book, it didn’t sell squat for a long time. A loooooooooooooong time.

 

Back then, if I sold a book a day, I was on FIRE! I was king of the world, a marketing genius! Things were going my way! Oprah was sure to call. I started rehearsing my Oprah interview questions and answers. Honest!

 

sk-well
Your writing self image when sales suck.

I don’t care where you are on the sales volume ladder, if you go a few days without making a sale, you will be convinced that you are suddenly a dog. Worthless. Unfit to walk the earth. Nothing is coming your way except more empty Amazon sales reports.

 

By picking a time frame of a week and setting my new-author-self’s expectations to sales over a week, I wasn’t disappointed if I didn’t sell a book that day. I kept doing things every day to sell books, knowing they’d come in. That’s hard when they don’t come in, which is why you track efforts and results, but you want to give yourself enough time to produce a result before stopping an activity.

 

  1. UNDERSTAND: You are the same author on a good sales day as you were on a bad sales day. Your book is still just as good. (This is easy to say but hard to make yourself believe on a bad sales day.)

 

Welcome to the emotional roller coaster that is sales! It will mess with you!

 

Give yourself time to develop that thick skin for this. It’s not easy. I have had a book flying off the shelves. THOUSANDS of copies over a few short days. I was a guru. Talk to me three months later when I hadn’t sold for three days. I was an idiot. Except, I wasn’t. I was just as good as when I was selling big.

 

drunk
Sometimes the brain doesn’t get it, either.

Your brain understands this. Your gut does not.

 

At first, you will question everything when sales dip. Or when your second book doesn’t launch better than your first. Or when book three is a blockbuster and book four sells in piddles.

 

Guess what? Even if every book does better than the prior book, you’ll wonder why they didn’t do even better!

 

You’re a tough boss!

 

When you started, you were planting lots and lots of seeds, not knowing which activities might result in sales. Most seeds come to harvest later on, maybe after you stopped doing the activity.

 

  1. Good salespeople prospect all the time, and try different things. So do good authors. That may be different things for different authors, but consider an “all of the above” strategy until you have the sales volume you want.

 

My friend Jason Matthews constantly re-tweaks his SEO keywords in his books, among other things.

 

Another friend, Kelly Abell, does lots of events and signings and lectures. As in, talks to groups of people who came just to hear her speak.

 

Another friend doesn’t do jack, he just keeps writing books. (He’s the one the rest of us hate.)

 

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Like on a spread sheet? Ugh.

What you want to do is keep track of what you’re doing so that later on you can have an idea of what worked. That will help. Track results any way you can, so you don’t spend time or money on things that don’t work.

 

  1. Sometimes things fluctuate. Now, if your sales go to zero and stay there for six months, you really need to think about what you’re doing, but if you have an occasional blip, you need to let your emotional side know that it’s going to happen. Look for trends. Don’t freak out over any one little thing.

 

  1. Very rarely do two books sell the same. No two kids are alike, and your books are a lot your kids. They will sell in their own unique way.

 

Don’t get discouraged. Even Stephen King puts out a dud once in a while, but since his marking is so good you would never know it. Maybe if you had the insights on his sales numbers you would see certain books sell a lot better than others. He’s still a great writer.

 

Same with Steven Spielberg movies. Some are great; some are not. He’s still a great talent.

 

And in both cases, certain ones that didn’t do at the box office or with critics, you may have thought were terrific.

 

Don’t let your emotions run thing. Put your emotions in your books but try to keep them out of your book business.

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Dan's pic
Your humble host.

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Got a QUESTION? ASK IT! Hit the Contact Me button and I’ll see what I can do. (I have lots of smart friends.)

 

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi: an italian misadventure.” Click HERE to check out his other works.

 

3 Tips To Getting Over Your Holiday Writing Hurdles (The Emotional Rollercoaster, part 1)

 

00 santa hat writer
A visual representation of me if I were a lady in a Santa hat. Even I don’t get this one.

I expected to get a ton of writing done at Christmas last year. NOTHING got done!

 

 

NOTHING!!!

 

 

Writer’s slump? Maybe.

 

Don’t you HATE it when the words aren’t flowing, or you can’t get motivated to write? Or other writing related hurdles?

 

The thing is, it passes.

 

Think about how difficult it was to share your work with another person the first time. Hopefully they were nice no matter how good or bad it was. Whether it was shared on Facebook, with friends, a spouse, a critique group, SHARING was a mountain BEFORE you did it – and now we look back and see it wasn’t such a big deal.

 

businesswoman-pointing-gun-to-computer-laptop-sitting-office-desk-desperate-stressed-young-attractive-having-problems-47931112
Write, damn you!

Somehow, we got through it.

 

Lots of hurdles are that way. You just knew about some of them, like publishing or getting reviews. Maybe you had an idea of what writer’s block was, but it hadn’t ever happened, or you never had to push through a case of lack of motivation all by yourself.

 

Those are all hurdles, too, and they seem HUGE when you are in them.

 

Worry not.

 

There are ways over your WRITER HURDLE just like any other kind of hurdle. Here are a few suggestions.

 

  1. Down in the dumps? Help somebody else. Volunteer at a soup kitchen or help another author with their problem. Misery loves company but in this case your input might help them get past their hurdle. It feels good to help. You want to feel good. I feel great every time one of you says that I helped you, or thanks me, whether you do it in a comment here or in a private message (and I get a LOT of those). They all feel great! (And don’t worry, I’ll be asking every one of you to buy a book pretty soon to show how much I really helped you.)

 

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Oh, it’s a compliment, eh?

Remember, when you help a writer friend and they say “no” to your suggestion, that’s a good sign. They instinctively have a better one percolating. Or they’re an asshole. Hold back the desire to stab them. “No” is good and so is “yes.” Talking about it with a sympathetic ear that belongs to a writer makes a big difference. Normal people don’t understand. Find that ear. Talk to it. (Did you just get a flash of a big ear sitting on a table at a coffee shop and you were talking to it, with no person attached? I did. Weird.)

 

  1. Writer’s block? Do a flash fiction challenge. Muscles atrophy and so does your sharpness as a writer. Don’t let it. You can force yourself to write something that is just for fun and it can restart you engine.

 

  1. Stuck on a plot point? Talk, or think up an alternate ending.
    man-reading-book
    Ooh, that’s GOOD!

    Send in your problem. Maybe we’ll air the options here and when people say “Ooh that’s good!” – WOW, the wind goes right back into your sails.

 

What else is bothering you? Let me know. There are lots of smart people here. No need to suffer in silence.

 

Most important, realize: with a few exceptions, you are not a robot. You have emotions or your stories would read like instruction manuals for Legos. This is a different business from a lot of others because it is so personal (more on that in part 2), and that can magnify things, so don’t let it. Learn to develop a thicker skin. But until then, ASK FOR THAT HELP.

 

Everybody here wants to help you.

 

Let us.

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REBLOG me! Or SHARE this post on Facebook and Twitter! See those little buttons down below? Put on your glasses. There they are. Click them. The FOLLOW button is now in the lower right hand corner.

 

Got a QUESTION? ASK IT! Hit the Contact Me button and I’ll see what I can do. (I have lots of smart friends.)

 

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi: an italian misadventure.” Click HERE to check out his other works.

 

 

DO NOT GET DISCOURAGED!! The 6 Things You Need To Do To Be A Successful Author

 

 

If you look at some author groups on Facebook, you hear a lot of complaints: no sales, no reviews, no royalties, marketing is hard…

 

anti_no_crap_yard_signApparently, life sucks for authors.

 

 

DO NOT BUY INTO THIS CRAP!

 

Complaining about book sales is a bitchfest designed to… do what, exactly?

 

COMPLAINER: Is anyone selling books? I hear authors selling one or two every now and then but no one I know is making a killing, or has a best seller!

 

REPLY 1: Not selling as many these days as 2010-2011. I definitely know authors who are doing well. It usually requires writing great books and several of them and sticking with it for years.

 

REPLY 2: No one is going to sell much as long as they continue with Kindle Unlimited.

 

COMPLAINER: My friends say they sell, but what they don’t say, is they buy the books, & give them away. “I say, that’s no sell.” As they don’t make no money, nor royalties on their books.

 

REPLY 3: I have made no money on anything I’ve written or published at all in any format

 

REPLY 4: I published for the first time in January this year and things were going okay until around July when it nose dived. It picked up a bit until this month and now I barely sell one or two a day. I’m hoping that if I self publish my next, which I hope to do early next year, it will kick start sales of my current book.

 

REPLY 5: I have done well but need to put out new books.

 

REPLY 6: My sales have collapsed. The only sales these past few weeks were 6 in Germany, (Amazon de) and as I have to reach 100 Euros before I get paid, I will almost certainly never be paid for those. I assume just too many books out there.

 

REPLY 7: I sold a few here and there until ‘BOOK NAME’ was released in early October. It stood at #1 in SPORTS VENUE best sellers during October and remained in the top 10 so far throughout November, so sales have been brisker.

 

COMPLAINER: A few are selling books, but those authors are going out of their way, to pay promoting companies. Plus traveling to different cities to book signings, & talking about their books to everyone that will listen. Having a box of books in their car, in case someone wants to buy.

 

REPLY 8: marketing has to be done regardless – even if it means door knocking your locl district then moving furture afield. yes cart books in cars – in your handbag what ever where ever, -I used to sell many years back and travelled a long way

 

REPLY 9: Well, I have to admit that I do almost nothing to promote my books. (rueful face)

 

REPLY 10: So very true. It’s a consistent process to build an audience and a following, and requires all of that, and more.

 

REPLY 11: I agree sales have plummeted…wonder what’s happening? Too many books, or too many poor books?

 

REPLY 12: Right now I’m selling more Audio books than ebooks. I’m lucky I have two good narrators and I’m moving all of my books to audio.

 

REPLY 13: I think that audio books are the way to go!

 

REPLY 14: Would you mind sharing names of your narrators please. I would look at all

 

th
I am completely inspired now.

I skipped two replies, because they offered success stories and the other people didn’t seem to read them.

  • One said they had sold 10,000 copies this year so far and was doing well on KOLL, and
  • the other said her friend was doing really well.

 

curious-woman
Why would they do that?

Why did the responders skip the success stories?

 

Because it’s easier to blame other people than to look in the mirror and say “I need to do more.”

 

If life sucks as an author, go do something else. PLENTY of people make money selling books. Two of my friends just got signed with publishers last week. TWO IN THE SAME WEEK. One of my friends is doing so well she just quit her job to write full time. A few of my friends have bestselling books.

 

I don’t know a million people, so what’s happening? Why do I know the success stories and so many other authors don’t?

 

I was a sales manager for Fortune 500 companies for many years, folks, so I know a little about the attitudes of salespeople. What does that have to do with being an author? You’re selling books aren’t you?

 

Well, no, not according to those comments…

 

IF your sales are weak, you have two choices: it’s me, or the stupid buying public.

 

Which means 99.99% of the time, it’s you. Luckily, you can fix what’s wrong!

 

stressed-woman-with-blonde-hair-with-hands-on-head-near-computer
They were just… awful.

I have read LOTS of people’s books. People who WANT to be published. It is a twenty to one ratio of bad to good. And that doesn’t count the 2 or 3 times as many I skip because the opening line sucks or the topic doesn’t appeal to me in some way.

 

I can afford to be fussy! So should you! The buying public is!

 

Look, that doesn’t mean MY opening lines are always amazing, or that every one of my books is a page turner.

 

But they SHOULD BE.

 

You must, must, MUST have a good cover. We’ve talked about this. It’s a mini billboard ad for your book. It MUST make people want to look further – as in, read the blurb.

 

The blurb is not a mini story, it is AD COPY, a small advertisement for your product, the story.

 

The opening lines needs to be interesting. So does the opening paragraph. So does the opening chapter, but an opening chapter has to do a lot of other things, too. Like set up what the book is about.

 

Look, it’s simple if you address it properly. Did you see Schindler’s List or Titanic? We KNOW what happens in BOTH of those stories BEFORE we ever watch ten seconds of film. Titanic sinks. Jews get killed in WWII. There’s your plots.

 

But the stories that get told are amazing, and both became blockbusters.

 

And everybody already knew the stories.

 

Spielberg starts with a candle and a Jewish prayer but quickly gets into watching this wealthy guy get dressed and then go charm a bunch of Nazi officials at dinner. It’s like watching a con artist ply his trade. What’s going on? Who is this guy? LOOK HOW SMART HE IS! He’s conning everybody! I wish I was as charming as that.

 

There’s a whole story going on along with the one we know, but it starts right away and does so in an intriguing manner.

 

What is the ONE piece of advice I’d give any new writer about their story? Take the most interesting thing in the chapter and say it first, in the opening paragraph if possible and in the opening line if you can. Grab my attention somehow.

 

After that, write a good story, keep the story moving, get a decent cover and learn how to write a blurb.

 

THEN you can start to MARKET your book.

 

TO RECAP:6

  1. start with the most interesting thing
  2. write a good story
  3. keep the story moving
  4. good book cover = eye catching
  5. good blurb = makes you wanna click to buy or read more
  6. marketing

 

 

That’s a whopping SIX things you need to do to be successful. I’d be willing to bet that NONE of the complainers are doing all six.

 

Know how I know?

 

I was a sales manager for a long time. I had to work with people I’d trained, but after I trained them on what to do, many didn’t do it.

 

And they weren’t successful because they didn’t.

 

Many, many, many people made more money working for me than they ever did in their entire lives.  Many didn’t do what was necessary and quit or got let go.

 

  • Authors, you have to market. If you don’t, you won’t be successful.
  • You have to write a good book. If you don’t, you won’t be successful.
  • Each of the six building blocks requires the other five, so if one is weak the others can compensate a little but if one doesn’t exist, the entity fails. If one is super strong, that can carry the whole thing. That doesn’t happen often. As in, less than 1 in a million. So you better get good at all six.

 

When you aren’t, your book won’t sell. You can then join the ranks of the complainers who know everything else is at fault except their efforts.

 

But we know the truth.

 

I want you to be successful. Move away from the folks who can’t or won’t do it. The naysayers. The whiners and complainers. You can fail all on your own; you don’t need their input, and odds are they are wasting loads of your time, too.

 

Find the “can do” folks.

 

Thumbs Up

But in the end it’s YOU who has to do it. And we’ll help. Cos complainers have figured out this blog is not the place for them.

 

YOU can do this. It isn’t easy, but it isn’t hard, either. And it’s not luck.

 

If your writing sucks, join a critique group. Inside of 30 days you’ll see stuff you’re doing wrong, and inside of 90 days you’ll be a better writer. Stay in the critique group. A year later you’ll be amazed at how good you’ve become.

 

If your cover sucks, hire somebody to make one. They don’t have to cost $500. I know artists who have made covers for bestsellers that cost under $50. If you don’t have $50, there are cheaper places, too, and you can LEARN to do it yourself for free – as in, you probably can’t do it on day 1, that stuff will suck. It’ll look homemade. You’ll need to learn it.

 

If your marketing sucks, ask other people what worked. A lot of good marketing doesn’t cost anything, like your Amazon page and a Goodreads page, Twitter, Facebook, etc., but you’d be amazed at how many flailing writers don’t have an Amazon page set up!

 

If you’re a crappy storyteller, think about why you want to be a writer. Read good storytellers. Emulate them the way a kid playing baseball wants to emulate Babe Ruth. Listen to audiobooks. By the way, a LOT of stuff is free at the library so it doesn’t have to cost money. Practice your craft in flash fiction challenges and in critique groups.

 

Get the idea? It’s all fixable.

 

If you put in the effort.

 

And stay the hell away from people who are too lazy to do the necessary work and just want to have you end up down at their level to complain  with so they don’t feel bad about their own lack of effort.

 

You. Can. Do it.

 

I’ll help you.

 

What the HECK is a Virtual Assistant???

Your humble host.
Your humble host.

I know people who use Virtual Assistants and swear by them, and I know a lot of authors who are swamped with trying to run a blog and Twitter and Instagram and Pinterest and Snapchat, etc., and still find time to write – but don’t think they can delegate any of these tasks, and don’t think they can afford a VA.

So I asked my friend Michelle to explain what a Virtual Assistant is, and what she does, and to answer some basic questions for our group.

If you have additional questions or want to know more, ask your questions below as comments (others may have the same question) or contact Michelle directly. I’ll then ask her to answer it here, too, as a reply, and everyone can see her wonderful, friendly demeanor.

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MM 1A note to Dan’s readers: This post may come across as quite self-promoting, I know. I am writing about what a virtual assistant is because I AM a virtual assistant. I feel great about what I do, love helping people get organized, and think many people can benefit from quality assistance. What I’m not doing is writing to convert dozens of readers to clients. I work with only a handful of clients at a time, so that really isn’t my goal at all! If you are interested in more information, I would be more than happy to consult with you, and I have a wonderful network of great VAs who I can refer you to if we aren’t a good fit or if I just don’t have the bandwidth to help you.

That being said…

What is a Virtual Assistant??

I’m not talking about Facebook’s “M” or Siri or Cortana, here. A Virtual Assistant is (generally) an independent contractor who provides business support for multiple clients remotely. Some are generalists, and others have specialties. There is a very wide variety of personalities and skills in the VA industry. It has been growing for well over a decade and shows no signs of stopping.

MM 2As a VA, I work personally with creative professionals in order to maximize their time and efficiency and make them more productive and profitable. It’s a partnership in which I take over administrative tasks so that my clients can focus their energy on things only they can do.

If you are a writer, you need to put pen to paper (or, you know, fingers to keyboard)! All of the other things: the invoicing, website management, research, bookkeeping, travel planning, newsletter scheduling – those things should be handled by someone who can’t do what you are gifted and trained to do best.

Why Contract a Virtual Assistant??

Yeah. That.
Yeah. That.

I generally find that I can complete a client’s administrative and business support tasks in about 50-75% of the time it takes a client to do the same task, so not only does the client gain that much time, but the work is completed SOONER than it would have been if the client was handling it alone. Here are a few other quick reasons.

Partner with a VA so that you can…

  • Keep up the momentum of your growing business by letting your VA take care of things quickly.
  • Take a step back and look at the bigger picture of your business while your VA takes care of more of the nitty gritty stuff (including reports and analytics to help show you the progress you are making).
  • Avoid burnout by delegating the things you hate and focusing only on what you love to do.

What is the Cost of a Virtual Assistant??

Value is the importance, worth, and usefulness of something.

Of course, dollars do matter. As I said earlier, there is a lot of variety in this industry! You may pay anywhere from $2-$200 per hour, depending on what you need help with and the skills/experience of the VA, or you may pay a set retainer per month. Essentially, you can find a VA on any budget! I will caution you, though, that you get what you pay for. I have gone through several VAs of my own, and I’ve seen this to be true.

So before you decide on a budget and begin a search for your own VA, think about value.

tired_1794882bHow much is your time worth? What is it worth to you to get an extra 15, 30, or 50 hours a month to invest back into your craft, give to your family, or further your education?

What would it mean to you to finally be organized and on top of your back-end business tasks that bog you down? To know that nothing is falling through the cracks?

What sucks up your time that you DREAD doing? How would it feel to get that off your plate?

Examples and More Information

I’d like to leave you with a hopefully-inspirational list of tasks that you, as a writer, could delegate to a Virtual Assistant. (Note: it will be up to you to make sure the person you partner with is capable of performing all of the tasks you need assistance with, so make sure to vet your candidates! Some of the tasks below require specialized skills.)

  • Research & Fact-Finding
  • Scheduling Interviews or Promotional Activities
  • Formatting
  • Email Sorting & Screening
  • Invoicing & Bookkeeping
  • Proofreading & Editing
  • Website Set-Up & Maintenance
  • Publishing Assistance
  • Copyright Registration
  • E-Newsletter Management

Michelle Martinez partners with busy creative professionals to maximize their time and efficiency and keep them organized. She is the all-in-one solution for her client’s virtual business support needs. For more information, please visit http://michelle.io or email michelle@michelle.io and follow @MichelleAssist on Twitter!

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Your humble host.
Your humble host.

REBLOG me! Or SHARE this post on Facebook and Twitter! See those little buttons down below? Put on your glasses. There they are. Click them. The FOLLOW button is now in the lower right hand corner.

Got a QUESTION? ASK IT! Hit the Contact Me button and I’ll see what I can do. (I have lots of smart friends.)

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi: an italian misadventure.” Click HERE to check out his other works.

Who Should I Read?

woman-armfull-books-bigst
There’s gotta be something good in here!

We all have our favorite authors (and some of you have read and enjoyed my stuff), but the question is…

If we, as authors, are supposed to “read a lot and write a lot” – not necessarily in that order – to improve our craft, then it stands to reason we should be, well…

Reading.

I read a lot, but probably not as much as I should.

Allow me to explain.

I read a lot of new authors. People who need the help that I can give them. People who need basic improvement.

I read other stuff, but mostly I do my reading in critiques. That’s where the biggest volume takes place.

Me, trying to look cool.
Me, trying to look cool. Not a lot of book reading got done on this snorkeling vacation.

What I bring to the table is an impatient reader who likes detail sometimes, likes the story to move along, and doesn’t mind dwelling on things that are important. What I referred to as a lazy reader. You have to hook me and keep me.

But!

If I am going to improve as an author, I need to read other authors, maybe, who are not like me.

So, if you’ve read my stuff or not, who would you recommend that I read? You can pick one author or three, but I would like:

  1. a specific book you read
  2. why it was important to you as opposed to your eighth grade English teacher

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Jenny's new bff Anne Rice
Jenny’s new bff Anne Rice. CLICK TO ENLARGE.

For example, recently Jenny wrote about how Interview With The Vampire really made her take a new appreciation of character development in the story. BTW, that post caught the eye of Anne Rice, author of Interview With The Vampire, who then posted about it in her – Anne Rice’s –  Facebook page. How cool is that?  (I did not read that book. I saw the movie. Click HERE to see he post that Anne Rice liked and made Jenny subsequently freak out.)

Anyway, I want your recommendations. Here three of mine.

  • Bill Cosby, his LP from 1968 “To Russell, My Brother, Whom I Slept With” I watched as my older brothers and sisters laughed at this comedian who told funny stories about his life growing up, and it impressed me as a child that comedy was a powerful device. A record is just an audiobook, after all. It counts.
  • Mark Twain, “How To Tell A Story And Other Essays.” Not the stuff we were forced to read but his speeches and comments were what drew me to Twain. Then I saw that Bill Cosby was the modern version of this classic storyteller, and that good, funny writing could tell the rules to fuck off and still be amazing. Erma Bombeck, Dave Barry, and a lot of others, would write in a similar style, but the original was the best. And he could be deathly serious at times, too, which I didn’t appreciate until much later in life.
  • Stephen King, “A Change Of Seasons,” specifically “The Body” opened my eyes to deep personal emotions in writing that anyone can connect with. It was my first exposure to King’s writing and I almost didn’t read it. A friend recommended it, and I said, “Aw, I’m not into scary crap, and his movies suck.” (I was thinking Carrie, Cujo). The Shining would become one of my favorite movies and King would become a favorite author, even though he still writes a lot of stuff I don’t like. Maybe I should read more of him, but The Body hooked me and kept me and I gained an appreciation of what it is to be a writer.

So those are my recommendations

What are YOURS?

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Your humble host.
Your humble host.

REBLOG me! Or SHARE this post on Facebook and Twitter! See those little buttons down below? Put on your glasses. There they are. Click them. The FOLLOW button is now in the lower right hand corner.

Got a QUESTION? ASK IT! Hit the Contact Me button and I’ll see what I can do. (I have lots of smart friends.)

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi: an italian misadventure.” Click HERE to check out his other works.

What Did #1LineWed Do For Me?

A little while back we talked about social media and some of the hashtags you can use. Today was “one line Wednesday” (#1linewed)

(Okay, we talk about social  media a lot, like HERE, HERE, and HERE also HERE and HERE, and yes these are all different.)

There’s a theme each week and you do whatever the theme is. Today it was “last line of the chapter.” Easy enough. But by posting a dozen or so tweets with the last lines of chapters and tweeting with the #1linewed, you can generate traffic to your Twitter account, your blog, and maybe add a few followers.

That tall bar? That's today!
That tall bar? That’s today!

Here are my results

  • LOTS of Twitter traffic (see the above kickass bar chart)
  • added about 50 or so Twitter followers today
  • a better than average blog traffic day – but that can be because of the tweets or the topic, so several things go into that, below:

    Blog traffic - today is orange
    Blog traffic – today is orange
  • added 10 blog followers in the last 16 hours, so that’s about when I started tweeting (again, several things go into that)
  • a couple of people liked my Facebook author page

Not bad, and I wanted to let you know!

7 Ways To Improve Your Blog Presence & Grow Your Platform

We're all busy. Here's how to be more efficient with the same time expenditure.
We’re all busy. Here’s how to be more efficient with the same time expenditure.

The biggest thing you can do to build a loyal, quality base for your author platform is to reliably deliver quality content in your books, your blogs, and your social media.

That takes time, and we wanna be writing.

Here are seven ways to help without taking a ton of time.

  1. Write two new blog posts every week that are helpful and informative to whoever your particular blog’s market is. For mine it’s other writers, so I write blogs that are “how to” or useful somehow for building a base or whatever. That’s Sunday and Monday. Use the hashtag for those days and tweet about your blog topic a few times during the day.

#SundayBlogShare

#MondayBlogs

  1. Wednesday be sure to play the one line Wednesday #1lineWeds on Twitter. Use stuff from your writing and try to get their hashtag and your website into your tweet so you have something that draws interested parties back to your blog.
See my blog site in there?
See my blog site in there?

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  1. On Saturday (I think it’s Saturday) there’s a blog rerun and rehash. So you rerun your BEST blog posts – the ones that got the most likes or comments, or the ones you think are most helpful.

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  1. Make sure you cheerfully thank anyone who comments on your blog. You may publish a blog on Monday but that doesn’t mean everybody reads it on Monday. You will see comments trickle in through the week. Be sure to reply to each one and be friendly when you do.
Thanks for the support!
Thanks for the support!

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  1. If you can do a guest blog post, do it. Not every site allows them, but right now I am. You’ll get bigger exposure and draw readers to your site as well.

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  1. On the days you’re not posting a blog, or whenever it best fits into your schedule, read other people’s blogs and comment on them. Each comment you make on someone else’s blog is a small advertisement for the content on your website.

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  1. Use tags in your blog posts. I haven’t historically done a lot of that and I’m just starting to, but supposedly it’s a big deal for getting noticed by search engines. You need that.
Well, maybe that last one...
Easy-peasy.

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Basically, that gives you base-building activities seven days a week by only blogging twice a week. Not bad!

There are more (there always are) but this is a good start. Get to it.

What are some tips YOU recommend?

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Your humble host.
Your humble host.

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Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi: an italian misadventure.” Check out his other works HERE.