Crazy Train Dialogue About Reincarnation

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Yesterday, Suzanne mentioned being atheist, and whether that might play a role in the soul mates story.

Actually, it does.

I keep thinking that every once in a while when the two characters get together and can’t be together, they have discussions along these lines, like why is this the case or whatever and religion would probably be a part of that. One of them might take the approach of they were meant to be together, trying to convince the other one of that.

If somebody is facing the thought of going off to war, he might take a stroll in the evening with his lover in a field and hold her hand, and they might talk about what if he doesn’t come back. That kind of naturally segues into a religious conversation

This scene could be him having to report for active duty Monday morning and they’re talking on Saturday night; she has to play piano in church on Sunday and he says he hates to waste so much time of their last hours that way. (This might take place on the phone if it takes place in a historically later scene; that’s how it was written, but it can take place as part of a date and be in 1849 with a few changes. That’s an example of how stories can be lifted and placed where they’re needed. Here he also has a daughter he refers to, but that can be changed.)

Meanwhile, I keep using that phrase “soul mates.” I wonder if that should be the title? Soul Mates. With a snappy subtitle like “love never dies,” or “TRUE love never dies.” Or is that too vampire movie sounding? REAL LOVE IS TIMELESS

Ooh, I just gave myself chills. Let me work up something for that…

Anyway, here’s the dialogue

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She (Green) bristles at “waste” and says he could come to church; he (Brown) says no.

Green: Why not?

Brown: Maybe I will come see you between services. How long is the break?

Green: Twenty minutes. Maybe a little longer

Brown: That’s a pretty long break. Is that between services?

Green: No, that would be during the sermon. I sneak with Helen for her smoke break.

Brown: Good grief, a twenty minute sermon? I could not go to a church like that!

Nobody gets to bitch at me for twenty unrestricted minutes. Even the sergeant doesn’t go that long.

Green: We’ll see how long Rev Jones goes. That would be short for him

Brown: I would have to interrupt and create a counter argument

Green: And it’s not bitching.

Brown: And probably find myself invited to not return

Green: Seems like it’s been a while since you went to church. Is that why?

Brown: Did you go to church schools when you were in grade school and high school, or regular public schools?

Green: Regular public

Brown: I went to church schools. I don’t need remedial lessons on reading and math and I don’t need them on religion. After that many years, I get it. And after that many years they still don’t have any more answers than they did when I started.

Green: Yeah not much changes

Brown: Well if something is proven to be true it doesn’t need to change but if somebody can’t explain something to you after 2000 years, maybe they’re just making it up as they go along. Or maybe they just don’t know.

This type of thing is a balancing act for me. I believe things and I can’t necessarily explain them – and I don’t usually respect people who can’t explain things

Green: Probably they don’t know but they pretend they do

Brown: Being generous, I will say smarter people than me have studied this their whole lives and this was the best they could do. As in, if it can’t be figured out they did their best to make it understandable. At the end of the day I can look out my window and see trees and plants and birds and animals and say to myself this is not just a series of random accidents. Because if I go all the way back to whatever the hell it all started, someone or something started it and whatever that someone or something is, that is God. Whether it is a benevolent and all-knowing being or some entity our brains are not adroit enough to conceive, that’s what it is. But I hate to think if my daughter were to die or if I were to die that we completely cease to exist. That may be the case, but I hate to believe it. I would hate to think that I could die in a car wreck tomorrow and for the rest of eternity never see my daughter again. Or that there simply is no eternity, that I simply ceased to exist, that is just unfathomable. But maybe it’s unfathomable because I was taught that we would be reunited. Well it’s certainly happier to think that than to think it’s a lightbulb that goes out.

Green: Yeah I know. I don’t think I believe there’s nothing. But I’m not sure I believe what I was trained to believe either.

Brown: I know. But I also know if my daughter on her deathbed from cancer, let’s say, and she was about to pass away, I would tell her. I would hold her hand and I would tell her that I will see her soon in heaven. Because I would not want her to be afraid. The thought of that not being a possibility is so deeply painful, that I can’t let myself believe it to be true.

Green: Right. There’s nothing wrong with that. It may be correct.

Brown: And to think of my own consciousness ceasing to exist and then whatever that would be, is so lonely a thought that I can’t embrace that either. So that’s why I choose to believe. Because the other two things I can think of are so deeply painful that I don’t want them to be true. And I will rationalize this and say just like I can’t jump off the ground and fly because that is the way the ultimate being designed it, I can’t conceive of those things because the ultimate being has decided I’m not supposed to be able to. That it’s wrong in the same way that I know and I have learned that I can’t jump off the ground and fly. Maybe I can’t explain gravity fully but it’s the same concept. I jump off the ground and I land in the same way that there is a heaven for me to believe in. Not because I want it to be so but because it is so and I just can’t explain it. How’s that?

Green: That’s fair. Makes sense.

Brown: There’s a heaven and a God because nothing else makes sense.

Green: I think the “choose to believe” holds a lot of truth. At some point it is a choice. (This would be where she says what about eastern ideas.)

7 thoughts on “Crazy Train Dialogue About Reincarnation

  1. That’s a rational and (for one about religion) a friendly conversation, but of course it’s Saturday night and there’s still Sunday to come.
    I wonder how the same conversation would play on Sunday, with Monday morning looming? Maybe more tension, hasty words? Hasty deeds even?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Reasonable people tend to be able to discuss these things reasonably. No one is trying to change anyone else’s mind here. They are young people talking about things that he’s not really ever thought about before. Challenging what they’ve been taught, as young people do.

      But

      It allows the premise of reincarnation to be discussed for readers, and in a respectful manner. That said, I’m sure some people who are looking to be offended, will be. I’m not sure I care. There are people who are going to be upset if unmarried people have sex. Or cuss. So this is not the book for them.

      Liked by 1 person

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