Robin Leigh Morgan On Changing Genres, a reblog from Kristina Stanley

head shot
Your humble host

I’m a big fan of Kristina’s blog and I always enjoy when she has a particularly insightful guest.

Recently she had a guest post by Robin Leigh Morgan about the differences encountered when an author changes their writing genre.

Robin’s challenges going from nonfiction to fiction were the same as mine, and the idea of publishing a collection of short stories and flash fiction pieces is absolutely brilliant.

It’s great stuff, so enjoy.

.

From Kristina Stanley’s blog

00 ks 1.jpg

Author, book reviewer, and blogger,  Robin Leigh Morgan joins us today to discuss changing genres. Robin is a member of the RWA [Romance Writers of America] and the SCBWI [Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators].

CHANGING GENRES by Robin Leigh Morgan

Some of us who have chosen to write fiction come from a variety of places. And by “a variety of places,” I’m not referring to a physical location; I’m referring to our writing experiences.

There are some of us who have enjoyed writing since we were children, and each year, by writing something in school, it improved. For some of us, it continued until we graduated college and began working. Some of us entered the work force taking jobs, which required us to write, whether it was procedures, handbooks/manuals, or news stories. But all of these are non-fiction, and each one has a set of “rules” that need to be followed to write something well enough to be acceptable.

As for myself, while my regular job did not require me to write, for eleven years I wrote articles [commentaries/viewpoints] of what was happening in my community and my feelings about it. When I started to write these items, my writing skills were not honed. I didn’t have my ideas organized in a tight manner, although my writing had been informative. By the time I’d written my last item, I’d become quite adept at it.

making the transition from non-fiction to fiction, I’ve had to learn a new set of rules on how to write. Most of these involved dialogue, showing not telling…

When I started to write fiction, I somehow drifted to writing a contemporary romance story with a paranormal element running through the storyline, but after almost 9 years I still hadn’t completed it. That is, until someone suggested I should try writing for a much younger audience, which is what I did; cumulating in my first YA Paranormal/Time Travel/First Kiss romance novel entitled I Kissed a Ghost.

I had to learn not to be overly descriptive of something, but allow my reader to create the image for themselves in their minds.

Anyway, making the transition from non-fiction to fiction, I’ve had to learn a new set of rules on how to write. Most of these involved dialogue, showing not telling, where before I just told. I now had to learn about the use of tags. I had to learn not to be overly descriptive of something, but allow my reader to create the image for themselves in their minds. In the beginning I found it hard to break my old writing habits. Now I’m finding myself with these habits essentially gone. The biggest issue I still have and am trying to get a good handle on, is POV [Point of View]. Regardless of what’s happening or being said it has to be in one character’s perspective, and you can’t flip-flop between two characters within a scene. There needs to be a transition from one character to another.

Click HERE to enjoy the rest of the post and Robin’s amazing insights.

 

 

14 thoughts on “Robin Leigh Morgan On Changing Genres, a reblog from Kristina Stanley

  1. Thank you, Robin, for sharing the difficulty you had switching from non-fiction to fiction. In my day job I have to do some technical writing which causes havoc with my fiction writing. I’ve noticed some stiffness due to this. Thanks, Dan for the sharing Robin’s post with us.

    Liked by 1 person

What do YOU think? Let me hear from ya.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s