Breaking Down Your Crazy Massive Epic Saga Into A Manageable Story

This is the synopsis of my six galaxy time travel epic fantasy odyssey. Wanna read it?
This is the synopsis of my six galaxy time travel epic fantasy odyssey. Wanna read it?

The real worry of any big three volume (or larger) book series is when it’s in the writer’s head. It’s the massiveness of the thing. The complexity. Most authors are intimidated, really, to attack such a piece and make it, well, actually a written story. So it stays in their head. And in various notepads and computers. A dream without expression.

Oh, and then in book 13, the Gator People attack back at the aliens! ... who have aligned themselves with the mutant princess!
Oh, and then in book 13, the Gator People attack back at the aliens!
… who have aligned themselves with the mutant princess!

Yeah, that’s going nowhere.

We attack this problem like every other challenge of the overwhelmingly large variety:

Q: How do you eat an elephant?

The answer is, ONE bite at a time.

I... don't understand metaphors!
I… don’t understand metaphors!

So you take your notes and you take your story and you put it in a folder, but you lay out an outline of how this giant narrative unfolds. Doesn’t matter the order, per se, just how you want it to come out to the reader.

There could be a 10 page outline or a 10 sentence outline of the story of Cinderella, depending on what you need in the outline:

A little girl’s mom dies,

Her dad remarries then he dies,

The stepmom is evil and cruel,

A fairy godmother intervenes,

The girl meets the prince,

There is some confusion about a shoe,

The prince and the girl ultimately end up together and live happily ever after.

This sounds familiar.
This sounds familiar.

That’s the 20,000 feet outline.

Boil your outline down to its bare bones and it’ll fit on a page or less. We’ll get into details later.

THEN, and this is the tough part, pick ONE small section of that massive story that’s in your head and just tell that mini-story. Pick a tiny piece of the mini story and do that piece in 3000 words or less. Then let’s look at that. So, you may have many sections that could be their own book. The goal is to make one fully formed chapter from one of those books – not rough or raw – oh, and it needs to be SHORT. 3,000 words or less. Baby steps, so you and your intended reader can get to know each other before you demand a big wedding with seventeen bridesmaids and a family of nine kids and a vacation condo in the mountains.

I thought we really hit it off at dinner.
I thought we really hit it off at dinner.

Next, let somebody read it.

Gasp!

Just the little 3,000 word piece, in case that wasn’t clear. And without any rambling prologue or explanations from you.

JUST the 3,000 word piece.

People will understand that there’s more to the story that came before and that come after; that’s no big deal. They don’t need to know everything to enjoy most of a 3000 word piece, so don’t tell them everything.

Their lives did NOT all begin on page one of chapter one. Got it.
Their lives did NOT all begin on page one of chapter one. Got it.

I’m no Star Wars geek, but it’s a good way to understand taking a big project and breaking it down into manageable pieces. When George Lucas first wrote what would become Star Wars, it was this entire big saga that he wanted to make as one movie in a few hours running time. It was too big for that (that’s obvious now, six or eight Star Wars movies later). They kept telling him to find a smaller piece and a smaller piece until he decided on what he called “Episode IV, A New Hope.” That became the original Star Wars movie that came out in 1977.

You remember, the REAL one. The one that didn’t suck.

Zero in on a small section. Maybe your favorite section.
Zero in on a small section. Maybe your favorite section.

That’s what you’re trying to do. Start with a small piece that can be its own story/book, and then write one fully formed chapter of it.

JUST ONE
JUST ONE

That may be some hard work but it’ll bear good fruit, I’m sure. And if you make an outline you’ll stay on track for where everything is supposed to go.

You won’t go veering off in new directions all the time. As those particular new idea itches come up, make a note about what a great thing it would be if XYZ happened, and stick ‘em in a file. Otherwise you have 10,000 great ideas and zero books written.

JUST ONE!!!
JUST ONE!!!

Baby steps. Start small and build. That’s how a massive mansion gets made, or a mighty oak tree comes from a small acorn.

Or how a massively huge intimidating saga in your head gets written.

Resolve to eat your elephant one bite at a time.

Fame and fortune surely await you!
Fame and fortune surely await you!

Now go get ‘em, Binkie!

Published by Dan Alatorre AUTHOR

International bestselling author Dan Alatorre has 17 titles published in over a dozen languages. From Romance in Poggibonsi to action and adventure in the sci-fi thriller The Navigators, to comedies like Night Of The Colonoscopy: A Horror Story (Sort Of) and the heartwarming and humorous anecdotes about parenting in the popular Savvy Stories series, his knack for surprising audiences and making you laugh or cry - or hang onto the edge of your seat - has been enjoyed by audiences around the world. And you are guaranteed to get a page turner every time. “That’s my style,” Dan says. “Grab you on page one and then send you on a roller coaster ride, regardless of the story or genre.” Readers agree, making his string of #1 bestsellers popular across the globe. He will make you chuckle or shed tears, sometimes on the same page. His novels always contain twists and turns, and his nonfiction will stay in your heart forever. Dan resides in the Tampa area with his wife and daughter. You can find him blogging away almost every day on www.DanAlatorre or watch his hilarious YouTube show every week Writers Off Task With Friends. Dan’s marketing book 25 eBook Marketing Tips You Wish You Knew has been a valuable tool for new authors (it’s free if you subscribe to his newsletter) and his dedication to helping other authors is evident in his helpful blog.

5 thoughts on “Breaking Down Your Crazy Massive Epic Saga Into A Manageable Story

Leave a Reply to D.G.Kaye Cancel reply

%d bloggers like this: