3 Tips for Writing AMAZING Plot Twists

coverUsing my unreleased manuscript An Angel On Her Shoulder, I am showing you my techniques for reworking a story into a more readable, more enjoyable piece. It’s 45+ lessons in about 45 days. (To start at Chapter 1, click HERE; the prior chapter is HERE.)

To view it best, bring up the two versions in different windows and view them side by side to see what was changed.

Then give me your thoughts in the comment section.

Plot Twists

We’re going to cover TWO big important topics in this chapter.

Again, the chapter is short – maybe it’s too short. That’s not one of the topics.

This chapter could easily be folded into the one before it or after it, but you have to ask if it deserves to be a chapter by itself. I can see it both ways.

If you have a lot of chapters that are very short, the book will have a cheap feel to it. On the other hand, since many stories are viewed on an e-Reader, that audience may not notice the physical shortness of the chapters. (When you can turn a page and see a few paragraphs are all there are to the next chapter, it can feel a little off, like something’s wrong. It looks a strange.)

Write your story however it feels best to you and what you’re trying to convey. Here, we don’t have a lot of information we need to convey.

Read the chapter and I’ll see you at the bottom to discuss Plots Twists and something else.


Chapter 38 “FINAL”

 

“Please stay back, sir.” The officer moved past me, one hand holding onto his plastic-wrapped hat and the other unrolling another piece of yellow tape between two trees. The plastic ribbon arced in the wind like the billowing sail on the winning America’s Cup yacht.

“Sure.” I had to shout to be heard over the driving wind and rain. “I had an appointment scheduled here for an hour ago. Can you tell me what happened?”

“An hour ago?” He squinted at me, blinking rain out of his eyes. “You know the man who worked here?”

“I met him. I was supposed to be having a meeting with him.”

“You should be glad you missed it.” Another gust whipped up. He re-gripped his hat. “There was a break in. Can’t let you in. They tossed the place pretty good.”

“I understand.” I nodded. “Was anybody inside?”

He nodded toward a van marked Hillsborough County Coroner.

An uneasy feeling welled inside me.

Another cop approached, turning his back to the wind and speaking to the first officer. I took a few steps back, but since they had to practically to yell to hear each other, I could hear them too.

“Whatever happened in there, it’s hard to imagine anybody survived when there’s this much blood. Did you get a look inside?”

Tension gripped my shoulders, not wanting to hear what the officers would let slip, but not daring to leave without knowing.

“I can’t see anybody walking out of there.” The first officer shook his head. “The walls were practically painted red. We called homicide the minute we got here.”

“Where’s the body?”

Body.

A crushing wave of disbelief tore through me, knocking the breath out of me and almost sending me to my knees. I stepped away and turned to the grass, my insides churning. Hands on knees, I gasped, trying not to vomit.

I could not believe Tyree was dead.

“Looks like whoever did this moved the body after they killed him. The CSIs said that’s not unusual. We checked the car they torched. That was his, too.”

“Anybody in it?”

“No.”

The second officer looked down, wiping rain from his neck. “I had a glance in the door when I first got here. It looked pretty bad.”

I stared at the grass, trying to inhale. I had just talked to Tyree this morning.

“Worst I’ve ever seen in fifteen years. The whole place was trashed, every inch. Just destroyed.” He shook his head. “They even tore open the walls. Ripped the plaster right off the walls in places. And there was blood everywhere. I mean, everywhere. The coroner’s asking us to bring in a couple of extra guys.”

“Okay.” The second officer nodded. “I’ll call in the request.”

I managed to step further back as the two officers parted, my ears ringing. Through the pouring rain, I stumbled to my car and got in.

Water dripped from my hair and nose as I gripped the steering wheel. My head was humming. Somebody destroyed Tyree’s office and killed him in a very messy way.

I just talked to him this morning, a few hours ago.

I’d been leaving messages all morning for a dead man. They might even have been killing him when I was calling. That sent a shiver down my spine.

He was being killed right when I was supposed to be there. But I was late. If I had been on time, I might be dead, too. From the amount of blood everywhere, I would be dead.

Queasiness roiled inside me. What do we do now?

I put down the car window and stared at the office building fifty feet away. Inside the busted doorframe, a desk sat on its side and a computer laid on the floor. Papers were scattered everywhere. Cops in raincoats streamed in and out.

Adrenaline and fear pulsed through me until I could taste it in the back of my throat. I felt half numb and half terrified, but completely overwhelmed. I was more afraid than I had been at the winery. There, I saw it happen from the doorway. I knew I was safe the entire time.

Here, I’d been an hour away from getting killed along with Tyree.

My heart sank. He wouldn’t have been here if not for me.

I called him in.

If not for me, he’d still be trying to fish in this crappy weather or chasing a barmaid somewhere.

I swallowed hard and started the car. I definitely wanted to leave town and go to Atlanta. Today. Now.

When I tell Mallory what happened, she’ll…

I set my forehead on the steering wheel and closed my eyes.

When I tell her Tyree is dead.

“Oh, God.” It sounded impossible. Somebody I had just met was now dead. Gruesomely murdered by—who? Or what? Someone or something found him.

I bolted upright.

It’s going to find us.

Panic gripped me. My mind was a blur of horrific thoughts, each worse than the last.

If I hadn’t been late, they would have gotten me, too. In addition to him. Or, maybe instead of Tyree.

A white flash of terror crossed my brain. Hell, maybe it just got the wrong target.

How close I’d come to being killed. How—

The floor dropped out of my stomach. Maybe I wasn’t even the target. I’d left my wife and child home alone to come to this meeting.

They were unaware. Defenseless.

What if the target was Mallory and Sophie?

I jammed my car into gear and stomped the accelerator, spinning my wheels and racing out of the parking lot.


Original Chapter 38, An Angel On Her Shoulder

 

“Please stay back, sir.”

The yellow crime scene tape surrounding Tyree’s office flapped in the wind. I had approached a cop near one of the squad cars. He called out to me as I approached the building, holding his hat to keep the wind from taking it.

“Sure or course,” I said loudly over the wind and rain. “I had an appointment scheduled here for an hour ago. Can you tell me what happened?”

“An hour ago? You know the man who worked here?”

“I met him. I was supposed to be having a meeting with him.”

“You should be glad you missed it.” Another gust whipped up. “There was a break in. Can’t let you in. They tossed the place pretty good.”

“I understand,” I said. “Was anybody inside?”

He looked at me, then looked over at a van marked Hillsborough County Coroner.

Another cop walked over. The two of them conversed, but since they had to practically to yell to hear each other over the wind, I could hear them too.

“Whatever happened in there, it’s hard to imagine anybody survived when there’s this much blood. Did you see it?”

“I can’t see anybody walking out of there. The walls were practically painted red. We called homicide the minute we got here.”

“Where’s the body?”

“Looks like whoever did this moved the body after they killed him. That’s not so unusual. We checked the car they torched. That was his, too.”

“Anybody in it?”

“No.”

“I had a glance in the door when I first got here. It looked pretty bad.”

“Worst I’ve ever seen in fifteen years. The whole place was trashed, every inch. Just destroyed. They even tore open the walls. Ripped the plaster right off the walls in places. And there was blood everywhere. I mean, everywhere. The coroner’s asking us to bring in a couple of extra guys.”

“Okay. I’ll call in the request.”

I stepped back as the two officers parted, not believing my ears.

Tyree was dead.

I walked back to my car in a daze, letting the rain wash over me. My head was humming. Somebody destroyed Tyree’s office and killed him in a very messy way.

I had just talked to him this morning, a few hours ago…

I’d been leaving messages all morning for a dead man. They might even have been killing him when I was calling. That sent a shiver down my spine.

He was being killed right when I was supposed to be there. But I was late. If I had been on time, I might be dead, too. From the amount of blood everywhere, I would be dead.

Now my head really started to buzz. I felt sick.

I climbed into my car, and sat there, with no idea what to do. I put down the car window and stared at the office building fifty feet away. Through the broken door I could see a broken desk and a trashed computer. A few police officers in raincoats walked in and out.

 

I felt half numb and half terrified. I was more scared than I had been at the winery. In that scenario, I was able to see it all happen from the doorway; I knew I was safe the entire time. Here, I was unable to stop thinking about being on time and getting killed along with Tyree. He might not even have been here of not for me; I called him in. He wouldn’t have even been in Tampa. He would have been off fishing or chasing barmaids or something.

I started the car.

Now I definitely want to leave town and go to Atlanta. When I tell Michele what happened, she’ll be on board, too.

When I tell her Tyree is dead

I set my forehead on the steering wheel and closed my eyes. “Oh, God…” It sounded impossible. Somebody I had just met was now dead. Gruesomely murdered by – what?

Someone or something found him; it is going to find us. If I hadn’t been late, they would have gotten me, too. In addition to him. Or, maybe instead of Tyree.

Hell, maybe it just got the wrong target.

Then the floor dropped out of my stomach as a terrifying though came to me.

Good God almighty, maybe I wasn’t even the target! What if it was Michele and Savvy? I just left my wife and child home alone defenseless.

I stomped the accelerator and raced back to my house.


ANALYSIS

What was the point of this chapter? To get Doug over to Tyree’s office and realize maybe he’d been faked out so the demon could kill his wife and child when they were not suspecting an attack.

First, that was a pretty good place to end a chapter, right? How do you not turn the page?

I rock! 

Building Emotion In A Scene (our 2nd topic, presented first.)

Your logical brain says Doug’s wife and child will be okay in the same manner you never really thought Harry Potter would die in any of his books or movies. This just doesn’t seem to be the kind of story that kills a bunch of people. But your emotional brain – represented by Doug – wonders and worries. And rightly so, after what Doug has just seen. And now your logical brain is wondering what tricks the author might be up to. After all, he did that whole they-both-had-the-same-dream thing…

Okay, so:

How much emotion do we want to put in a chapter, and HOW should we do it?

In real life, if you heard two cops saying:

“The walls were practically painted red. We called homicide the minute we got here.”

“Where’s the body?”

you’re going to have a reaction.

When you think your wife and daughter are potentially in a life-threatening situation you’re going to have a reaction.

So you need to think as if you are hearing this information for the first time, like your character is, and then consider what would you (as the character) do.

See, here’s the problem.

As the writer, you know what’s going to happen – so there’s no mystery in this story for you! Before you write the words, you had to think up the action. If you are writing this scene, you knew Doug was being diverted. You knew that before you wrote it, so you were kinda unemotional about it. That’s just how it is. Know that.

In the first draft, the right information is there but the right emotional element is not.

I had all the right stuff happening in my original draft, it just wasn’t as intense as it should have been.

In the “Final” draft, more of that emotion is there, but it still probably isn’t at a dramatic enough level. To be honest, Doug’s not really as over the top as he needs to be until the very last lines when he goes speeding out of the parking lot.

It’s a difficult balance – so do it in steps.

  • First, just get the information down. Decide what needs to happen, and write it down.
  • Second, look at your stagecraft and see: did I set this up right? Am I delivering a good punch? That’s the physical manipulation of the information, as we discussed previously. Arrange it so you have the set up and the punch line in the right order.
  • Third, go through and emphasize the things that need to be emphasized, making sure they come in the right place. An example of this would be when he sees the door off its hinges.

The third step needs some explaining.

3A. How does seeing that hanging door make Doug feel, immediately? Briefly write it in or make a note that he’d have a reaction there. A Critique Partner (CP) can help with this. Every place they feel there’d be a reaction of any sort, they can note it somehow. For certain CPs, I type EMOTIONAL REACTION HERE and highlight it in yellow.

3B. For every new piece of information Doug gets that would make him feel worse, you need to show him feeling worse. Whether that’s clutching his stomach or falling to his knees or gasping for air, he needs to react physically to show what he’s feeling emotionally. (Depending on your writing style, you might also supplement that with some internal thoughts like I did.)

The best way to show increasing emotions in a scene: Math

Okay, it’s not really math, but it kinda is.

3C. Make a list. Take a separate sheet of paper or open a new blank page in your computer, and write down 10 emotional reactions, then arrange them in increasing severity.

  • The first may be your stomach gets an uneasy feeling.
  • The second might be feeling like a vice gripped your belly.
  • List as many as possible
  • Use the internet to find additional ones for your list:
    • search ways to show emotion of X (fear, anxiety, etc.).
    • Look at images of facial expressions on actors showing the emotion you need, and write down what you see, adding it to your list. And
    • SAVE the list because guess what, you’ll need it again some day.

At the end of your list, maybe you have cold streaks of panicky sweat running down the face of your character’s forehead or have them dying of a heart attack. Good. Write all that down.

Fourth: Arrange the list by increasing severity.

Fifth: Now you add – see? math – add an emotional reaction immediately after each place you identified as where a reaction should occur.

  1. Put it as close as possible so it has impact,
  2. go up a step on your list each time.

Figure out what reactions are right for your character as they step higher and higher on the emotional reaction ladder.

Just drop it in, don’t write it smooth yet.

That takes energy, and spending energy on writing will take away energy needed for emotional awareness. There’s time.

Consider every place your character gets another bit of information that should cause him to react. Another reaction, or an increase in reaction, may not be needed every time. That’s where the art comes back in. You may take one out and then on the next place where a reaction is warranted skip two steps on your ladder. That’s up to you and your scene’s requirements.

It’s really like a check list to make sure you deliver the ideas you wanted to have in the scene, and it works for whatever scenes need increasing emotions.

Happy, sad, romantic, whatever.

To a certain extent, I did that here with Doug – more organically than scientifically.

Either way, the element has to be there, and since as a reader we like this guy and like his wife and like his daughter, we’re going to turn the page after we found out they might be in trouble.

We want to find out what happened, so we will – but it’s a much better ride if it’s painted properly with the right levels of increasing emotions.

 

Writing Amazing Plot Twists

2nd topic, presented… second. Or was this first topic? If it was first, how man it be second??? It had to be the second topic! Stop messing with me!

We waited on this because we needed a few to happen so you could understand the subtleties, and, well… for another reason.

If I went on and on about twists right before a chapter with a big twist, you’d REALLY be on the lookout for them. So we’re doing it here. Now we’ve had a few, so we can objectively look back and see how we feel about them.

How do you write a really good twist in your story? One that makes readers say, Wow, I never saw that coming! – in a good way?

Allison recently said (HERE) writing a plot twist in your story is like telling a joke. I agree. (She also did a guest blog post for me explaining plot twists, HERE)

Why does a twist work?

Well, why does a joke work?

The basic element of a joke is this: we set up a pattern and then we don’t follow the pattern.

That’s it.

Goodnight!

Okay, you want some details. Well, you can’t laugh at something that doesn’t surprise you. It is partially the element of surprise that makes something funny. Also, it needs to ring true or be based in reality, but those are subtleties we can get into another time.

There are probably millions of articles about why certain things are funny (most of the articles don’t do a very good job of explaining it, and neither will this one because teaching you how to be funny is not the point), but it’s basically what I just said a few paragraphs ago.

It starts with a pattern – the set up.

The pattern would go like this: one… two…

What comes next?

If it’s a joke, the word “duck” comes next.

One, two, duck. That is the basis of humor.

By establishing one and two, the reader’s logical mind will go ahead and make the leap to say the next word will be three.

But having the next word be duck, your punch line, it is not only not what they were expecting but it is pretty far in the opposite direction. It wasn’t even a number or anything mathematical. It was a freaking duck.

Now, with a joke, you can have a topper. That’s another funny, related line that goes after the punch line, to keep the audience laughing. And there can be a topper to the topper.

That’s when people laugh so hard they wet themselves or can’t breathe. I love that.

But I’m a little sadistic that way, as are most funny people. Once you get them to laugh at all, it’s MUCH easier to keep them laughing. (Timing is having the topper come in before the all the laughter from the first joke has died down, and the same with topping the topper, to get the can’t breathe effect. If you wanted to know that.)

WHY do we care about this?

Because

This information works with every emotion.

Remember when I said:

as an author, if I can get you to laugh or cry, I own you?

You want that.

Here’s an example, and it’s kinda NSFW-ish. In my upcoming novel Poggibonsi, Mike, who is married, has to see a doctor who is a randy former girlfriend; he needs a physical to go overseas on business, so he reluctantly agrees to the examination:

She stretched a blue latex glove over her French manicured hands and let it go with a loud snap. “You know the best part about conducting a physical on you, Mike? I get to fondle your genitals and stick my finger up that cute little tushie of yours, and you have to pay me for the privilege.”

I tried to tuck a little more of the blue paper dress under my behind. “Let’s just keep things professional, okay?”

“And I am! What’s a little joking around between friends? Geez, when did you become such a fuddy-duddy?”

“Maybe after I got married and started a family.”

“Spoilsport. Okay, stand up and slide down your boxers. Or do you wear briefs now?”

“Aren’t we, um… gonna start with a stethoscope on the chest or something like that?”

“Who’s the medical expert here? There’s plenty of time for that later. Let’s go. Drop ‘em.” She sat down on a small stool and wheeled herself over as I slid off the table.

“Hold up the gown, please. Boxer briefs—how stylish. As always, Michael; thank you for manscaping.”

“Uh, my pleasure.”

“And there’s the little guy!”

“Hey! It’s not that little. And… it’s cold in here.”

“I was kidding!” She looked up at me. “Would I be fantasizing about you in Cabo if it wasn’t something to be proud of? Geez.” She resumed the exam. “Let’s see here. Well, Mike Junior looks clean and healthy. And there they are—hello boys.” She looked up again, smiling. “Honestly, Mike, I’ve always said you have a wonderful penis but these balls of yours are just amazing. You should be very proud of them.”

“Okay, see? You just—that’s skating right past the safety zone again there, Jan.”

“I’m just going to say it. You have pretty balls.”

“Jan!”

“What? These are the Brad Pitt of balls. The Tom Cruise of testicles.”

“You—hey, how about somebody not 50 years old?”

“Like Bradley Cooper?”

“Yeah.”

“Only if you stop shaving them.”

 

 

There are a few funny lines to get things rolling, but the jokes come from her saying outrageous stuff to him – the surprise element. Doctors don’t do that. The stagecraft is, he reacts negatively but he’s still friendly. The punch line is when she comments about pretty (and his reaction), and then there are the toppers. A Brad Pitt reference, that’s one. Tom Cruise, that’s two (and the fact that the references are alliterations helps). Mike’s protest that quickly turns into a vanity plea to not reference actors so old is another, lesser, topper, and her final line about shaving is the final topper. That’s Topping The Topper, the last one.

What relates to a reader in that scene? Lots of stuff

starting with the blue paper dress. Anyone who’s seen a doctor has worn one of those. So it connects with the reader. And the scene goes on after that and starts before that, so the reader is in a fun mindset when all this occurs.

The same thing works with a twist in your story.

Oh, and if you can’t tell a joke, don’t worry. Neither can most people. (Writing a joke is even harder because you can’t see the facial expression to tell whether the audience – a reader – is getting the setup or not.) Does that mean you can’t write a good twist? Initially, yes. But telling a joke requires timing and the ability to speak to another person, possibly to act – and writer types are typically introverts so you aren’t going in front of a room full of people and doing stand up routines.

In writing, a twist can be done over and over and over until it works. Because all you have to do is hand it to a new reader each time you make a change, and even have other writers suggest where to emphasize and where to scale back. That, plus some stagecraft, is really all there is to it.

In other chapters we went into stagecraft and the reactions of the other characters when you are portraying a scene, etc., so I won’t beat it to death again here, but reread the stagecraft stuff. It’ll help.

You might ask why are you going into this so much detail NOW?

Good question.

Because if I did it right before the chapter with the twist, you’d be expecting it. So I’m doing it here. Timing. Don’t wanna tip you off.

We’ve already seen a few twists in our story. One was the lion dream – but there were two twists there.

One twist, you probably saw coming.

The fact that the lions ripped open a package that turned out to be a child, you probably saw that coming. It wouldn’t be a nightmare if the package was an Amazon box with books in it.

If the package is the zookeeper’s wrapped up version of the lion’s food, that’s not a big deal either. Your logical brain kinda expects the package to be related somehow to the lion and its normal situation, but lions and packages don’t go together, so you are already thinking about what it could be.

But because this story has had an aura of paranormal to it, it wasn’t a big surprise for that to turn out to be a child. So that was a little bit of a twist but you saw it coming.

The twist you didn’t see coming

was Mallory having the same dream. (Magicians call that distraction, making you focus where they want you so they can surprise you with something else. Proof that good storytelling is magical.)

And what heightened that moment (as we said in that chapter’s analysis) was the stagecraft: her face turning white and her dropping her coffee cup and it shattering – all in contrast to Doug, who was just waking up.

Why, it’s a mini roller coaster! You have the nightmare (a high drama moment) and then Doug gets over it and he’s waking up (low moment) and he’s got the dog (ultra low moment) and he’s wondering what he wants to tell his wife – and he casually tells her and she freaks out. She gives a BIG reaction.

So that’s a twist you don’t see coming.

The pattern was: I had a dream, oh it was about our baby… the expected next item in the pattern would be something like, oh my gosh that’s terrible we need to do something.

Instead, what you got was something you were not expecting. She’s been having the same dream.

As a writer, you want to think, “What kind of a surprise would really KNOCK MY READER’S SOCKS OFF?”

Then do it.

(If it makes any sense.)

A bolt of lightning flying out of the sky and zapping the dog would certainly surprised everybody, but it doesn’t necessarily help the story. (Except maybe for cat lovers.)

When you have the choice – and you do – in the middle of your story to throw a curveball, think about what is the last thing your readers would expect.

Part of the reason the scene with the voodoo priestess worked was because you knew a little bit about Doug as a child having… Let’s just call them visions, and Dahlia saw it. His reaction helps the other side of that teeter totter. It’s one thing for her to know, it’s another thing for him to react saying there’s no way you could know!

See? That heightens your twist.

And then to reveal as another “twist” that his daughter has it as well. And then Dahlia’s got them on the floor and she just verbally pummeling him, MMA style. You had this, you gave it to her, you’ve been pretending you don’t have it, that’s why you keep getting sick, she’s got it too, that’s what happened in the winery.

I just imagine her standing over him thumping on him with her words one after the other. That’s a punch line and a topper and then topping the topper.

That one, I had in my pocket. I knew, almost from the beginning, that the daughter was seeing visions. For stagecraft reasons, I set it up over a long course, and let readers kinda “forget” stuff – have it not up front in their minds but easily recalled when necessary. That’s why we did it as a flashback. To get you all aware of what it happened in the winery scene and then wait for the reveal. Also, we talked about Doug’s visions really early in the story – the first chapters – and then we didn’t really talk too much about it after that. But the symptoms were the same; whenever he got confronted with evil, he felt queasy because he had been suppressing his ability to “see.”

Now, it was a risk to try to point that out, so I had Dalia do it. I really wasn’t certain readers would make the connection. And some still won’t. But she is pointing out in black-and-white in the middle of her scene that he gets sick because he’s been suppressing his vision, his aura, his “gift.”

Anybody who didn’t want to read paranormal shouldn’t have picked up the book, and anybody who got past chapter 3 and didn’t put the book down isn’t going to be disappointed now.

They are willing accomplices.

So if they willingly stayed, they are wanting this little story to unfold with paranormal stuff.

And we gave it to them.

Make sure you, doo, too.

Deliver what the reader is wanting, and deliver it as big as you can.

Part of it is teasing, and also every once in a while coming up and saying OK let’s do a 180. What’s the farthest thing anybody’s gonna be thinking of?

Did Mallory have to have that dream? Is it important to the plot at all?

No. We get the story without it.

It was simply added for The Dramatic Element. A twist. A way to keep readers on their toes and having fun.

Readers love that stuff. You did, right?

Now:

head shot

Let me have your comments. The next chapters will post tomorrow but they will ALL come down shortly after February 15, so don’t dawdle! (To start at Chapter 1, click HERE.; the prior chapter is HERE.)

You are readers, too. Your input will shape the final product. Be honest.

Share and reblog these! Your friends need to know this stuff, too.

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the amazingly great sci fi action thriller “The Navigators.” Click HERE to get your copy of The Navigators – $2.99 or FREE on Kindle Unlimited!

Available in paperback and audio book, too!

 

 

17 thoughts on “3 Tips for Writing AMAZING Plot Twists

    • That’s an excellent question. There’s nothing wrong with having a character make an assumption that turns out to be wrong, but in the meantime that character tells other characters and everybody in the book is thinking the same incorrect conclusion. The reader at some point starts to go along with the groupthink and will be surprised if it turns out not to be the case. Of course, I can’t tell you one way or the other here, but I like how you have your radar antenna up.

      Which signals another thing. This is a paranormal story but it’s also a mystery. Because it’s a mystery, readers are thinking as they read. They’re looking to see where the blind alleys are and where are the clues and what might be a deception. If an author moves forward without remembering his reader is smart, he makes a big mistake.

      Good job!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Doug’s reactions are spot on. At first there is the OMG then there is the F*** it’s Tyree and then the physical takes over and he is on his knees. The big fish is when he realises that he might have been set up and races off home. Also, I would be thinking, who is looking after them by making things happen so he would be late and i agree with Annette, is it really Tyree? We’ve not been told who’s body they found. Tyree might have legged it with the cross.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I too was thinking that there was no body and no Tyree….and that Tyree’s arrival the prior day was what distracted him from closing the door and then draining the battery. (going with the “looked out for” theory)

    Great stuff here.

    Liked by 1 person

What do YOU think? Let me hear from ya.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s