Writer’s Conferences – are they for YOU?

What, leave the house?
What, leave the house?

You see conferences posted all the time, and a lot of them just seem like a way to separate you from your money. And pry you out of your writer hole to interact with other human beings.

The horror.

Occasionally, though, there are some good conferences that are worth attending.

We’ve discussed other author events, like book fairs and whether they are right for you, HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/01/13/should-you-participate-in-a-book-fair-three-points-to-consider/

I went to the Florida Writer’s Association “mini conference” Saturday in Orlando. I’d never gone to anything like that before, and I had no idea what to expect.

Well, that’s exactly not true. I’d been to conferences for work lots of times; I just never went to a conference about writing. That, I tended to learn on line. Why would I need to go sit all day in a classroom? With, you know, people?

About twenty minutes before the conference started there were 35 people sitting in the room not saying a freaking word to each other.

Yep, that’s a group of writers. I’m in the right place.

Throughout the day there were maybe 200 attendees. Sessions were on landing an agent, marketing, writing your memoir, writing tools, etc. Each session was its own all-day thing, so I floated around to spend an hour or two in each one.

One particularly interesting session was titled How To Make Money Writing. Well, who doesn’t want to do that?

Sharon Keeble
Sharon Keeble

horse girlIt was hosted by author and writer Sharon Ward Keeble, an international journalist for more than two decades who specializes in articles about real-life people for a wide variety of national daily newspapers and weekly women’s magazines in the UK, U.S. and Australia. She also is an author and ghost writer, having penned a personal memoir about her adventures backpacking in China and her latest book, The Horse Girl.

So she’s walked the walk – for a long time – making money off her writing. We will be featuring here on these pages soon.

Plus she has a British accent, so I’ll try to get her to say “brilliant” a few times. Cos we love that.

I’ll be honest, the breakout marketing session only had about 12 participants, and only 1 other person besides me had put a book out, so the topics stayed kind of entry level. But the people leading the class were professionals who’d done author promotions with NY Times authors for years, so they were worth meeting. (If you can’t benefit from networking with the students, network with the instructors.)

Why, I could easily take over a group like that...
Why, I could easily take over a group like that…

And think about it: if there are only 12 people in a class, you can easily dominate the session and get all the information you need. I mean… you can get a lot more one on one time.

That’s what I meant.

Don’t take over the group.

A few tips from ME about sneaky as Hell marketing stuff HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/06/28/sneaky-as-hell-marketing-thats-also-brilliant/

Well, maybe that last one...
But this is my happy place!

If you’ve never gone to a writer’s conference before – I hadn’t – you probably should. You need to get out of the house for something besides your kid’s soccer practice, and it’s a great way to learn a few things, to reinforce some things, and to network. As much as I learn on websites or watching online tutorials, there’s something to be said for real in-person interaction and meeting fellow wordsmiths who actually live near you. You could, say, go have coffee and discuss writer stuff.

You’ll have to introduce yourself, though, because most don’t talk…

I had a good time doing writer stuff with writer types, in person. What a nice change. It’s easy on the internet to expose yourself to lots and lots of writers who are more successful than you – and make yourself feel inadequate as a result. At a conference, you’ll see who can help you move to the next level, and who you can help move up a step – and trust me, helping people feels good. Odds are you’ll learn something from them, too.

WOO HOO!!!
WOO HOO!!!

The Florida Writer’s Association has a full 4 day conference in October. Since it’s a writing related expense like training, it’s probably a tax deduction for your book writing business. I’ll be there, and you should think about coming.

There are worse places to be in October than Orlando, and just you might learn something!

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. You read this far; you need this stuff. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?
He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?

Enjoy my writing brilliance in all its glory on my Author Page HERE http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

and find out about the release of my new book “25 Great eBook Marketing Tips You Wish You Knew” by clicking the FOLLOW button, above.

When What You’ve Written… is CRAP!

Which was should I go here? Relax. Dan has the answer.
Which was should I go here?
Relax. Dan has the answer.

Recently we talked about writing better stories (HERE)

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/06/07/writing-better-stories-part-1/?preview_id=784

But sometimes you just write crap! You read it, and it’s terrible. You’re one of those people now. “Yesterday, I wrote the same paragraph over and over until it was perfect. Today I looked at it and it was shit.”

What then?

I actually had that happen yesterday!

Friends of mine know I usually think everything I write is just awesome, even if it has typos. Which is often.

All week, I’ve been knocking out chapters of my story. Three, I think; maybe four if you go back to last Sunday. Maybe 10,000 words. And another 3200 last night. I was KILLING IT. I’m not bragging, I’m saying I was on a roll. The story was flowing, I had nothing but fun scenes ahead to write. It was funny (it’s a comedy), it was sexy (it’s a romantic comedy) and…

and…

and it SUCKED.

I read stuff from those chapters and I was like whaaaaat? This looks like an amateur wrote it.

A good amateur, but an amateur.

Oh, the pain.

A visual representation of my soul at that time.
A visual representation of my soul at that time.

Then I realized something. Some of my writer friends have made comments like “Your writing has really improved” on chapters I wrote not that long ago. They were referring to this story as compared to prior stories of mine they’d read. That I also thought were awesome. (See above, where I said I think everything I write is awesome.)

Know what that means?

It means that I had improved as a writer but also I had improved in my ability as a reader of my writing, too – so I could the problems I couldn’t see before. (Listen for applause from critique partners)

See me learn to write better dialog HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/05/05/how-to-write-good-dialog/

WOO HOO!!!
WOO HOO!!!

While I was unhappy about having the errors, I was happy I could SEE them – and potentially fix them. Or enlist help to fix them.

We discussed the benefits of a critique group HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/why-you-should-join-a-critique-group-you-arrogant-sob/

That’s huge! That put the spurs to the horse, and I banged out a few thousand more words.

Because I can edit words on a page; I can’t edit a blank page. I can go back and add jokes (which I love doing), tighten phrasings (that just feels good, like scratching an itch), work in beats and take out repetitious words. Cos I wrote them

That was such a happy realization, that my stuff was crap!

I’m improving as a writer. That’s never a bad thing.

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. You read this far; you need this stuff. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?
He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi” – yeah, we know. We’re trying to convince him to change that title – check out his other works here http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1425128559&sr=1-1 and check back often for interesting stuff.

Songs of Life and Stories of… well, life, too.

This is great stuff! Who needs sleep?
This is great stuff! Who needs sleep?

The other night as I was trying to fall asleep at 3 AM after a huge writing binge (of which I’m particularly proud), there was a commercial on TV for some old ‘60s records. Maybe they were ‘70s I don’t know. Oldies though.

They played a snippet of a song that I never really knew and certainly didn’t ever hear on the radio, I don’t guess. It’s just got a great little melody and it’s sung in a very sweet manner.

I just always thought it was a great little love song.

It stuck in my head, so the next day, I looked up the lyrics on the internet, to learn about the song.

I thought it was the girl singing to the guy, saying you and I are in this together, we are a team, the world doesn’t get us but we don’t need the world. And there’s one particular line that every time he makes eyes at her, she runs to him.

I thought, how sweet! What a lucky guy.

I could not have been more wrong.

She’s breaking up with him. She says we’re not right for each other.

Him, afterwards
Him, afterwards, I guess

When she said she runs when he makes eyes at her, she is saying she’s running away.

“You and I travel to the beat of a different drum,” does not mean you and I, together against the world. It means you are marching to one drummer and I am marching to a different drummer. We ain’t even on the same page.

And she breaks up with him.

Yet another song that I thought was a great love song turns out to be completely the opposite.

Fucking internet.

Either I have a totally dyslexic ears from my youth, or I am one of the worst interpreters of songs in the world.

It happens!
It happens!

But you know what? I like my version better!

I like happy songs.

I’m sticking with that.

i am not making the connection to writing tips here
I am not making the connection to writing tips here

Now, WHAT does any of that have to do with writing? Well, if a reader gets off track – as has happened with my stuff from time to time – it can cause them to completely misinterpret a scene. One crit said I should start every chapter with a reintroduction of the characters, anticipating the reader putting the book down and not coming back for a few days.

What? That’s insane.

How about writing a book a reader can’t put down? And if they do put it down, hope that they are smart enough to go back a few pages and refresh themselves with the freaking story.

There’s so much bad advice out there, it boggles my mind. Rereading introductions every chapter? If I read the book straight through, that would cause me to put it down – and never pick it up again.

Books of bad advice for writers - and these are just the ones from this year!
Books of bad advice for writers – and these are just the ones from this year!

Lunacy.

Here’s the deal. Assume your reader is smart. Assume your critics mean well. But write a story that you’d want to read, and write it the way you’d want to read it.

For a songwriter, if you don’t write a great tune, the rest doesn’t much matter. Crappy lyrics? Linda Ronstadt isn’t singing it for you.

For a story writer, write a good story. One with a quick pace and interesting characters, told in a compelling manner. Otherwise, all the good grammar and stuff doesn’t matter.

And if some pinhead misinterprets it for twenty years or whatever, that’s on them. Because I’m a smart guy but I liked that song anyway, didn’t I? Even though I misunderstood it? Still do. It’s a classic.

I just like my version better.

Odds are that kind of screw up won’t happen with a book.

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. You read this far; you need this stuff. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?
He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?

Enjoy my writing brilliance in all its glory on my Author Page HERE http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

and find out about the release of my new book “25 Great eBook Marketing Tips You Wish You Knew” by emailing me at savvystories@outlook.com and I’ll let you know when you can get a free advance copy! Shh! Don’t tell.

Writer’s Block

I have no idea what this is.

I mean, I know it’s when a writer can’t write, can’t think of what to write, or whatever, but I have never had it.

I hear everyone gets it…

So I don’t hold myself out as special, I just wonder

WHAT IS IT?

Maybe everyone doesn’t get it, or there are different things that qualify.

What is writer’s block for you?

The Real F word: Writing FEELINGs Into Your Characters

man-reading-book

On occasion I’ll share a critique or a letter from a critique partner. The names of the writer and the story have been changed so I don’t have to give them credit for writing my blog for me.

Learn about why you should join a critique group HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/why-you-should-join-a-critique-group-you-arrogant-sob/

Dear Dan,

 

Some of my crits and beta readers suggest my writing is too male. I’ve been reading chik lit trying to get a better sense for how to go deeper with character development and the “F” word-feelings. I’ve noticed the opposite with some female writers; their male characters are too effeminate to be credible.

 

Here is an example:

 

“The character of Fred (in a post-apocalyptic zombie story) could use more emotional depth. For example, he finds a little girl. How does he feel about that? Is this a common thing, for him to see children and then treat them like adults? He really doesn’t internally process her presence at all.”

I don’t even know what some of that stuff means. And he’s writing to me for help!

The comments went on:

“I guess I want to know how he feels about the (post-apocalyptic world). Is he bitter? Did he give something/someone up? Does he resent his new life or does he like the freedom? Does she remind him of someone he left behind? I know a lot about his physical appearance and how he feels about that. Less of that would be okay. I would prefer to know more about his internal life.”

 

 

Wow, that’s a tricky area to navigate.

But I will. Cos that’s what we do here.

My critique partner asked:

When I read about Mike (the MC in Poggibonsi), I wonder the same thing. Are the ladies working you over for Mike’s leering? Do they want to know how he FEELS about being dissed by Mattie (Mike’s wife)? If Mike exposed these things would he just be pussywhipped or someone they have a crush on?

 

I’ve read a couple of Jilliane Hoffman’s books. That lady writes men like men. I mean you can feel the testosterone ooze off the pages. Then when she’s on the female characters, you see them entirely female.

 

I always appreciate your ideas, your candor and encouragement.

 

All this feeling stuff though, I need to go out and kill something.

That last comment is why I love the guy.

Don’t you, too, though? He’s trying so hard!

Okay, first decide who you are writing the story for. It’s not for everyone. Think of that target audience, narrow it down to one “person,” and write to him or her.

Learn more about that HERE:

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/06/11/whos-your-muse/

Then, don’t be afraid to show places where your character would have an emotion. It’s not all the time. If the zombie apocalypse story is lighthearted, it doesn’t need too much in the way of feelings. But characters evolve. Well, not the zombie characters. But the people in the zombie story may start out being not too feely, and grow to care about each other.

Shameless plug for upcoming novel
Shameless plug for upcoming novel

My MC in my comedy “Poggibonsi” doesn’t get beat up at all – because he is vulnerable. He has feelings and he shows them.

What are some things he does to show emotions?

The first thing he does, page one: he stops what he’s doing and talks to his young daughter. He picks her up and holds her. He takes the time to explain things to her in a way she’ll understand. That implies love.

Then, he wants to get frisky with his wife even though she’s grousing about being fat (she’s not fat). He ignores the comment and expresses his interest in her.

When they go shopping in Italy and she doesn’t buy anything and gets upset (again, because she says she’s fat – and while nobody else thinks that, does it really matter?) she decides to go drown her sorrow in ice cream, he doesn’t understand but he runs to open the door for her.

Plus, he has women flirting with him and he ignores it – because he loves his wife.

At school he’s involved with his daughter’s activities and friends. Now, that doesn’t mean his wife Mattie skips those things, but he’s involved.

Then he makes his daughter breakfast when his wife is hung over.

He worries about the possibility of divorce when he hears that her long-time friends are divorcing.

That’s all emotional stuff.

Later, they are traveling and they have a fight right before she has to return home (he has to stay a while longer for business) so she leaves on bad terms. He takes a shower in the hotel, then finds himself staring at the phone while he gets dressed. He wants her to call – we’ve all had that emotion – but by then she’s been so cruel to him just about every woman reading the story has given him permission to go cheat on her.

Go figure.

But that’s because it’s a story. You can do that in a story. It’s pretend, and people want to escape.

(Do not do that in real life. We will find your headless body in a ditch somewhere. You’ve been warned.)

When Mike leers at the beautiful young woman on the train, he feels bad about it. He worries about even sitting in the compartment with her, and doesn’t do it until somebody else does. He keeps checking her out, but he doesn’t think the other guy on the train should. He knows he shouldn’t be doing it either. He doesn’t say “Wow look at those tits!” He notices her eyes, her hair, her bracelet. And, well, yeah, her tits – because he’s a guy. But he doesn’t call them that. He even says derriere instead of ass or butt. That’s so women readers don’t get offended and also to show the character considers how women would feel about such words. That’s emotional stuff, his inner turmoil.

We talked a little about that stuff HERE

https://savvystories.wordpress.com/2015/05/19/748/

But in the end my story is mostly funny, so characters are allowed to be a bit crazy.

“If it’s funny enough, you can pretty much do anything.” – me.

I’m not saying I do it right 100% when it comes to emotions in my characters, or even that I get it right the first time. I bounced that “I’m fat” comment off a valued female critique partner. I asked another one how many lbs. a woman can gain after having a kid and being married 15 years, and not be fat but think she is – but no other women would think so. (Because his wife is not fat.) I don’t know the rules on this.

My critique partners do, though.

So I ask for input on things, and as a result my critique partners feel more open to guide me when I get off course.

Remember, I had to talk about “shooting” himself in the eye while masturbating. These ladies helped me write it so it would be funny and not offend women. Prior to that, they were advising me that Mattie on her period wouldn’t go to bed without underwear. When I changed that, and had her not be on her period, I got a few thank you’s – not because we couldn’t go there, but because it didn’t work. We want truth in our stories. And I wanted Mattie bottomless for the joke that came later.

Your character can’t be Clint Eastwood and Alan Alda, but he can start out more like Clint and end up more like Alan over the course of the story.

When the Zombie Guy meets the kid, he doesn’t act like he cares about her, but I was thinking he would after a while. That they’d become buddies. To do that, the author can have her trying to learn to be tough from him, and have him learning how to be soft from her. Or something. Have her ask him the questions the women critique partners are asking, and have him not have answers, then reflect on it.

You can add these things later, after you have the whole story written, but you can add them now. I’d do it now because you want to learn. Future chapters – and future stories – will benefit from that education.

Ask friends and critique partners for examples of ways to do it. It will be a sentence here and there, trust me. Like adding a few drops of cream turns coffee from black to beige. It doesn’t take much.

Without doing some of that, your characters may be too 2-dimensional.

How do you know who to ask?

When I get critiques, I turn around and read what that person writes. Do I understand and appreciate their writing? Do they see things how I do? Can I learn from them?

They can say whatever they want, but if I think their writing sucks, they don’t get much attention from then on. I like lots of my critique partners’ writing, but I explore each one. When you do that, see if you can spot the emotional reveal areas, and emulate a paragraph here and there. Adapt it. See how it fits with your characters. You’ll get there.

Ask for that help.

Ask for areas where it would occur and ask them to please give example of what might be said or done.

They’ll do it.

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. You read this far; you need this stuff. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

Carrrying that computer around makes him look like he knows something, doesn't it?
Carrrying that computer around makes him look like he knows something, doesn’t it?

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi” – yeah, we know. We’re trying to convince him to change that title – check out his other works here http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1425128559&sr=1-1 and check back often for interesting stuff.

Should I Hire An Editor?

Which was should I go here? Relax. Dan has the answer.
Which was should I go here?
Relax. Dan has the answer.

People ask me all the time, “Should I Hire An Editor?”

Yes.

And no.

There, that’s settled.

Different people have different needs, so let’s explore the options.

You and another author friend are coming up on your editing phase, and both of you want to hire editors – which is a decision I respect. A good editor earns their money. I know several.

You and your friend can help each other search for an editor, and maybe even find a better deal by offering two books – as in two customers – to the editor. Either way, if I’m a friend of yours, keep me in the loop. Maybe I can help, or refer someone, or learn something, or pass along the names of the editors you finally decide on. Maybe there’s a guest blog post in it for you, “My Quest For An Editor.”

There are MANY good editors out there, and they vary in price, and also in what they’ll do for you. The time to shop for editors is sooner, not later. You don’t necessarily have to wait until your book is finished. Sending a sample chapter to an editor will result in getting an estimate of what your whole book is going to cost to edit. Lots of spelling issues? That’s gonna run you more. Discover the wonder that is spellcheck. Have a friend proofread it and you proofread for them = money saved, starving artists!

Some beta readers catch spelling errors, too. That’s also a good time to send the sample out to an editor and start shopping. An editor will have a backlog and a schedule, too. No need to delay your publication any longer than necessary. Consider it multitasking.

What if you go the non-editor route?

You can!

I do!

So do smart people I know….

A friend recently self published her first novel and it was edited by herself (not a great idea for most of us because we don’t usually see our own errors after a second pass), with the help  of  her husband and some friends.

It was fine. Everyone survived. And they still talk to each other.

If you have author type friends – and you really should – they can edit, or help co-edit, for what I call “listing credit” (I’ll explain in a moment). Author friends can catch spelling and tense issues, too, and make a few suggestions or whatever else you want them to bring to the table. You can do this for them, too.

That way, you can list each other as the editors Amazon for your respective books (listing credit). That means the book you edit shows up on your Amazon author page. You can help edit four books for edit credit, and when you publish your first book on Ammy, there will be FIVE titles there for fans to see. There are a few easy steps, like creating an Amazon author page and “claiming” the book, but you can handle it. (If I can do it, you can.)

Five titles helps you look more established, makes your FIRST book look more credible when it comes out. It’s five ways for you to be found when people search, and it makes everyone’s books look more professional because somebody else is listed as editor. So do a good job. (Don’t have five books you can help with? Two is still better than one.)

On my author page, The Grandfather Tree is a book I helped edit with another author friend, so it shows up as a title on both of our author pages – cool, huh? For that reason, I’m big into trading favors, so when I help somebody they’ll help me and vice versa.

So I should… what?

Study up, ask friends, and make the call that’s best for you.

Paying an editor is a good idea, and I recommend it. Like I said, different people have different needs and a good editor earns their money. When you’re ready, I can help you with that process.

For me, between my critique group, beta readers, and a few friends, I’m thinking that’s as good as an edit – for me, and only part of the time. I like to get the task of editing accomplished through friends, as described above. Sometimes, that’s not the best way for me to go. I do it when I can.

Either way, I like to help new authors get established and start making money in this business, and I look to build lasting relationships that I hope lead to all of us toasting each other in some swanky New York literary club as we wait to receive our awards.

Cheers!

Want me to critique the first chapter of your story? SEND IT. Hit the Contact Me button and, you know, contact me. I’ll see what I can do.

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn't he?
He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi” – yeah, we know. We’re trying to convince him to change that title – check out his other works here http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1425128559&sr=1-1 and check back often for interesting stuff.

A Tip Of The Hat To Sara Given and “It’s Like They Know Us”

As part of her Father’s Day Special, Sara Given asked me and some other authors to make quirky captions for dad-related pictures. Sara is known for mocking the idyllic family images often used in ads to set unrealistic standards for normal people.)

ILTKU fathers day special 06212015

You can check out the rest of them here. Mine got 60 Likes by about 8am, so that was nice.

http://itsliketheyknowus.tumblr.com/

Happy Father’s Day

Here’s where Sara was features on ABC

http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/us-blog-mocks-unrealistic-photos-family-life/story?id=25895976

And a link to her hilarious book “Parenting Is Easy: You’re Probably Just Doing It Wrong”

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0761185658/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0761185658&linkCode=as2&tag=itslithknus-20&linkId=GLHSAHDMWN4PSDNX

Have a look. You’ll be glad you did.

.

Right now you want to subscribe to this blog and not miss another valuable bauble that falls from my fingertips. You read this far; you need this stuff. SUBSCRIBE TODAY (click the follow “Follow” button, above) and I’ll send you a free copy of my amazingly cute book “The Short Years” plus we’ll probably become friends and start hanging out and stuff.

He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?
He looks like he knows something, carrying that computer around, doesn’t he?

If you benefit from this blog, share it with your friends!

Dan Alatorre is the author of several bestsellers and the hilarious upcoming novel “Poggibonsi” – yeah, we know. We’re trying to convince him to change that title – check out his other works here http://www.amazon.com/Dan-Alatorre/e/B00EUX7HEU/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1425128559&sr=1-1 and check back often for interesting stuff.